Nov 10
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6 Fall Activities for the Elderly & Caretakers

Posted by allbizweb adminsupport | 2 minute read

Keeping activities for the elderly interesting and fun can prove to an enormous challenge for caretakers. Fall is the most nostalgic season, evocative of cool days spent picking apples, carving pumpkins, and walking through the woods. When older adults cannot do extensive amounts of physical activity due to health conditions, there are still a number of seasonal activities they can participate in. Here are just a few ways to celebrate the season and bring the outdoors indoors for your senior.

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Oct 15
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How Music Therapy Activities Benefit Dementia

Posted by allbizweb adminsupport | 4 minute read

The use of music therapy activities in senior living communities is known to have positive effects on elderly people suffering from Alzheimer’s and other memory loss issues. Music has power—especially for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. And it can spark compelling outcomes even in the very late stages of the disease.

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Oct 12
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When to Consider Assisted Living

Posted by allbizweb adminsupport | 5 minute read

There comes a time when to consider assisted living and many people resist the idea of moving to an assisted living facility because it feels like a loss of independence. However, there are many levels of assisted living. We have ten reasons why it may be worth considering.

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Sep 08
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What is Lewy Body Dementia and its Signs?

Posted by allbizweb adminsupport | 2 minute read

Most people associate dementia with Alzheimer's disease. But 1.3 million Americans have another form of dementia called Lewy body dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies. This progressive neurological disorder is named for the Lewy bodies -- tiny deposits of a protein called alpha-synuclein -- found in certain areas of the brain. Over time, these proteins accumulate and cause the death of brain cells. This results in impairments in certain cognitive functions, such as memory, language processing, emotions and behavior, as well as control of movement.

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May 20
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Coping with a family member with Alzheimer's Disease

Posted by allbizweb adminsupport | 3 minute read

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Alzheimer's has become the sixth leading cause of death in the nation. It is a progressive and fatal disease. Alzheimer's is considered to be the most common form of dementia. As the population ages, the instances of Alzheimer's increase. This leaves more families trying to cope with this disease.

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Dec 08
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Three Tools to Help Fight Alzheimer's Disease

Posted by allbizweb adminsupport | 3 minute read

There is no easy way to fight Fight Alzheimer's Disease but you can rest assured there effective methods at your disposal. Detection, prevention, and preclinical treatment are three key areas that may make a difference in the battle to reduce the rapid rise of new Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases every year. These three topics are the focus of an important new supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Organized by Guest Editor Jack de la Torre, MD, PhD, Professor of Neuropsychology at The University of Texas at Austin, the supplement is a novel guide to how Alzheimer dementia may be approached and managed right now, not years from now. It includes 23 articles contributed by an international group of noted AD experts. "This issue will be of interest to established researchers and young investigators seeking a broader knowledge of the AD problem, as well as to clinicians who deal with elderly patients or with individuals who may show up at their clinics as outpatients showing signs of cognitive dysfunction," notes Dr. de la Torre.

Coverage of detection includes insightful reviews and discussions of techniques and strategies that seek ways to identify AD before it starts, such as risk factors to dementia, retinal pathology, cardiovascular disorders, neurocognitive testing, assorted brain markers, hemodynamic changes, and neuroimaging assorted brain lesions.

In the area of prevention, investigators explore how a multidisciplinary approach involving brain and heart specialists can better create a plan of intervention for patients at risk of AD or for people presenting preclinical signs of dementia. Additional reviews in prevention include risk assessments to dementia, lifestyle and cognitive counseling to maintain normal cognition, and established preventive techniques that can help delay AD onset.

The final topic centers on pre-clinical AD treatment. Contributions suggest how effective pre-clinical treatments of AD offer the hope of significantly lowering skyrocketing incidence while extending healthcare and quality of life.

While these treatments are still at the experimental stage, they may offer a departure from the failed attempts of amyloid-beta therapy. As an example, a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Austin led by Dr. Francisco Gonzalez-Lima have demonstrated that oral administration of methylene blue, a substance used since the 19th century to treat many medical disorders, lessens learning and memory loss in rats with a poor blood supply to the brain caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in older people has been shown to be an important risk factor in Alzheimer's disease. Methylene blue appears to improve memory and learning in these animals by increasing mitochondrial energy activity in the brain. Mitochondrial energy dysfunction in the brain is not uncommon during advanced aging in the presence of disorders such as carotid occlusion, hypertension, brain trauma, diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Mitochondrial respiration leading to cognitive decline is also affected years before the onset of Alzheimer's disease in predisposed individuals. The results of this study suggests that daily oral administration of low dose methylene blue USP in elderly people at risk of Alzheimer's disease can be a useful treatment to fight Alzheimer's and prevent the start of memory decline or the beginning stages of the disease.

According to Dr de la Torre, "It seems an auspicious moment to open a dialogue between those pursuing a treatment for AD and those favoring prevention of this dementia. Such a dialogue could lead to a more effective course of action in confronting the needs of AD patients and those at risk of developing this disorder. The reviews contained in this supplementary issue of JAD may set the stage for such a discourse and in addition, provide some viable tracks on the road to discovering a realistic pathway for coping with this grim disorder."

 

Source and Thank you to - http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-effective-tools-alzheimer-disease.html

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Oct 20
0

Glen Campbell Shares Alzheimer's Struggle in Song: "I'm Not Gonna Miss You"

Posted by allbizweb adminsupport | 2 minute read

Legendary singer and songwriter Glen Campbell has been battling Alzheimer’s disease for years, and is now in the final stages of the disease. Campbell has been moved to 24-hour care, as his doctors have determined that he is in the sixth stage of Alzheimer’s (‘severe cognitive decline”).

It has been nearly two years since Campbell has performed in public — however, as a farewell to his music career, Campbell’s record label has released his final studio recording.

His final ballad is called “I’m Not Gonna Miss You.” The melody is somber and contemplative, but the lyrics show Campbell’s ability to find irony in his disease. The result is a beautiful combination of sadness and joy, which ends much too quickly.

Watch the video below to see the touching music video.

Share your thoughts below. We'd love to hear about your own experiences with Alzheimer's.

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